In Print

In Print – One & Done Book

I am a sucker for obscure sports knowledge, especially surrounding Boston. It all began when NBA legend Shaquille O’Neal had a cup of coffee with the Boston Celtics in 2010 and subsequently retired. I also remembered as a kid that baseball great Tom Seaver had come to the Red Sox for one year in 1986 and called it a career after personally limping to the finish line of Boston’s heartbreaking season culminating in a World Series loss to his former team, the New York Mets.
One and Done Book CoverI am a sucker for obscure sports knowledge, especially surrounding Boston. It all began when NBA legend Shaquille O’Neal had a cup of coffee with the Boston Celtics in 2010 and subsequently retired. I also remembered as a kid that baseball great Tom Seaver had come to the Red Sox for one year in 1986 and called it a career after personally limping to the finish line of Boston’s heartbreaking season culminating in a World Series loss to his former team, the New York Mets.It turns out the one year rental wasn’t just a phenomenon in the era of free agency, super teams and chasing rings. MLB Hall of Famer “Happy” Jack Chesbro, a long time Pittsburgh Pirate and New York Highlander (Yankee) came back to his home state of Massachusetts to play one final game in 1909 against his former New York teammates. He took the loss which happened to be the final punctuation mark of his career.From Dominique Wilkins just trying to find a home with the Celtics in 1994 before heading overseas to NHL Paul Coffey (below), ranking second all time in scoring for a defenseman (behind some guy named Bourque), showing that time is still undefeated before hanging up his skates one last time in the Bruins locker room, the phenomenon fascinates me. Any city with a major league team has seen the greats come and go before they could wave from the stands. I’m looking to fill a bookshelf with tributes to those players and those cities. 

In Print – Magazine Advertisements

I have a strange relationship with advertising. I despise Corporate America’s disregard for anything that doesn’t rhyme with “profit margin.” However, I live for the challenge of finding an unexpected angle to grab an audience’s attention to sell even the most mundane of products. At this point we have seen the same formula, mulched over us time and time again, which makes me want to do it better than what exists. One way I like to accomplish this is taking the familiar and tweaking it just enough to make someone look again. On the two page spread below, I have taken an all too familiar Boston scene which heavily relates to both the Red Sox and the Marathon, and changed the iconic Citgo sign to fit into Boston-based Reebok’s narrative. The make up of both logos, shape, color and composition were opportunities I could not pass up.Levis Ad Magazine SpreadAnother method is forcing fully irrelevant imagery to work to an advantage. In the case of these two Levi’s ads, the mandate was to target the 50-plus crowd with words and images that they could relate to in a “good old days” kind of fashion while getting a laugh and subconsciously getting them to think about an apparel classic. The 45 record adapter ad was required to be all visual.Death in many cultures is a constant fear. People are so busy having a grand old time here, they aren’t trying to give up those heated seats just yet. In the BMW ad, I have humanized the competing brands by giving them dates of birth and they have literally been buried by their fiercest competition.  All of this combines the unexpected, some humor and a dash of uneasiness.